Independent Author Spotlight: Jason E. Royle’s The Rapture Misunderstood

Jason E. Royle is pastor of St. Paul’s United Church of Christ in Schaefferstown, Pennsylvania. In The Rapture Misunderstood, Royle addresses the subject of the Rapture. For readers not familiar with the term and theological debates, the Rapture refers to a moment toward the end of time when Jesus will appear in the heavens, and those who believe in Him who have died will be raised followed by those who are alive and believe in Him. They will rise to meet Jesus in the sky. From there, and even before there, exists lots of disagreement among Christians. Royle’s book deals with themes of eschatology that go far beyond just the Rapture.

Summary

In his introduction, Royle states that he will not definitively answer all the questions. He keeps his promise, and that is a good thing. He divides the book into two parts. The first part is a short story illustrating misunderstandings regarding the rapture. (It seemed that there were a lot of other misunderstandings at work as well.) The second part is a brief summary of different views of the Eschatology. Royle does not argue for any one position over another.

The short story is a puzzling journey that follows Pastor Bell (I assume that he is no relation to Rob) as he leads his small group of disciples to bring about the end of time. Pastor Bell has good intentions but has a salad of theological beliefs and a buffoonish manner of taking himself too seriously. For some reason, a great deal of fictionalized Catholic mysticism shows up in the story, probably a take-off on Dan Brown and the like. In the end, the point of the story is that the timing of the Rapture is entirely in the Father’s hands. We can’t rush it or make it happen.

The second part of the book summarizes the major eschatological views—Historic Premillennialism, Dispensational Premillennialism, Amillennialism, and Postmillennialism, including their beliefs regarding Israel, the Rapture, and the timing of Christ’ return.

Analysis

As I wrote earlier, the short story portion though interesting and page turning is strange in some ways. It is hard to know just what pieces of Pastor Bell’s theology the author would agree and which portions he would not, though I suspect with most, that he would not. The Roman Catholic figures that appear are equally confusing. A monk tries to point Pastor Bell and his followers toward grace, but in the end, leads him toward the Vatican and ritual. While his conclusion is well-said, the getting there was hard to understand, because the story seemed to posit that Pastor Bell’s efforts almost worked.

The summary of the different eschatological positions was excellent. I believe that Royle stated each in a way that proponents of the views would find acceptable. For someone looking for a concise and understandable explanation of each, this book is very useful.

(Full discosure: I received a free copy from the author in exchange for a review. I was under no obligation to give a positive review.)

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